Subject: Some Information On The U.S. Broadcast

Posted on: January 16 2008 @ 03:15 PM
By: DerekInLA

Content:

Hello.



As I mentioned in the Podshock Live thread I had some information about the U.S. broadcast that some people might be interested in. Some of this I originally emailed to feedback@podshock.net back in December 2006, so some of this might have been mentioned during the live show if the hosts remembered it.



First, Fox actually did a great job marketing the film to the sci-fi/internet geeks at the time. AOL had a dedicated area for the movie and you could download the first internet available electronic press kit that contained a variety of items including video of the trailers, interviews, pictures, etc. Somewhere I still have this press kit on a 3.5" floppy disk, but whether or not the files can be opened today I have no idea.



Next, DW-the movie was the most expensive television movie ever made for Fox at the time. It cost around $5 Million which still makes it one of the, if not the, most expensive television movies ever produced for Fox.



The movie was part of Fox's Tuesday Night Movie series and the week before was the Twister knockoff called "Tornado" which starred Bruce Campbell. Tornado was the highest rated Fox TV movie in history at the time. This unfairly raised the expectations of the Doctor Who Movie since it was based on a pre-existing format and Tornado was just a cheap version of a theatrical film coming out a week after the broadcast.



There were two primary problems with the night that Fox chose to air the movie. One they could have avoided and that was scheduling it against the penultimate episode of Roseanne in which the John Goodman character has a heart attack. The other problem was something they probably could not have avoided. At the time (I don't know if this is still the case) Chicago, Illinois was the largest contingent of Doctor Who fans in the country. On the Tuesday night of the movie broadcast the Chicago Bulls were playing in the final game of the NBA Championship Series, so no Chicago fans were watching Doctor Who. They were all watching the Bulls win the championship.



There is a piece of ratings information that was ignored at the time though. Doctor Who: The Movie may have had low viewership for the broadcast, but Nielsen also monitored videotaping practices and The Movie was the most videotaped television show for the week. So, even though it didn't have a lot of viewers that night, most people did want to see it and recorded it to watch it later. Fox knew this at the time, but at the time no one cared about the time-shifting of television programs they way that they do now.



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Some Information On The U.S. Broadcast

Posted on: January 16 2008 @ 04:59 PM
By: tarashnat

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I also recorded the TV Movie as I was watching the Yankee game with my father. He was a big Mets fan, and former Met pitcher Dwight Gooden pitched a no-hitter that night for the Yankees against the Mariners. I watched the movie later that night, but the video quality wasn't great as my location in Manhattan had poor reception for Fox, as we would get ghosting due to the two transmitters at the time (WTC & ESB).


Some Information On The U.S. Broadcast

Posted on: January 17 2008 @ 08:03 AM
By: Linquel

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I was recording it and watching it live. I still have my videotape of it from that night. Big Grin


Some Information On The U.S. Broadcast

Posted on: January 20 2008 @ 09:51 PM
By: mad4plaid

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I was attending college in a town that did not have Fox - and neither did the cable provider in town. Thus, completely out of luck.

I have seen it since, but it would have been nice to see it while it was live.


Some Information On The U.S. Broadcast

Posted on: January 21 2008 @ 05:40 AM
By: Mohan

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I had heard these facts listed before and although I think that they are important to understand the full contextual story I am still not a fan of the Doctor Who movie. I still remembering cringing at the "Who am I?" scene and the kiss scene. What bothered me is that the story, as it was shown, did not have a Doctor Who feel--it was a badly put together American copy and I felt let down as a fan.

I've been watching Doctor Who since the early '80s and the Fox TV movie just did not work for me at all. It wasn't the acting but the script, I thought, was horrible.

I'm just glad that that movie didn't end Doctor Who.


Some Information On The U.S. Broadcast

Posted on: January 21 2008 @ 11:50 AM
By: DerekInLA

Content:

[QUOTE BY= Mohan] I had heard these facts listed before and although I think that they are important to understand the full contextual story I am still not a fan of the Doctor Who movie. I still remembering cringing at the "Who am I?" scene and the kiss scene. What bothered me is that the story, as it was shown, did not have a Doctor Who feel--it was a badly put together American copy and I felt let down as a fan.

I've been watching Doctor Who since the early '80s and the Fox TV movie just did not work for me at all. It wasn't the acting but the script, I thought, was horrible.

I'm just glad that that movie didn't end Doctor Who.[/QUOTE]

I would tend to agree with you. I don't think the movie was horrible, but it was definitely flawed. By any chance have you seen the DVD of the movie and the DVD extras with the producer explaining all of the problems with the various companies insisting on certain things (like who played the Master, etc.)? It is a really good short documentary and he agrees with all of us on what the faults of the movie are.

However, I do not believe that we would have the new TARDIS interior if it were not for the movie and the huge, yet beautiful, redesign.


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