The Gallifreyan Embassy
Home of the Doctor Who podcast DOCTOR WHO: PODSHOCK
Advertising | Donate | Feedback | New Website | Podshock | Shop | Forum | Media Gallery | Web Resources | Polls
 Gallifreyan Embassy 3.0  
  • Doctor Who: Podshock Live Show Reviewing 'Time Heist' Scheduled for Sunday, Sept 21st
  • How do you rate Doctor Who: Time Heist? (5=Fantastic)
  • Doctor Who: Podshock 310 - 'Listen' Reviewed
  • How do you rate Doctor Who: Listen? (5=Fantastic)
  • Doctor Who: Podshock Live Show Reviewing 'Listen' Scheduled for Sunday, Sept 14th
  • Doctor Who: Podshock 309 - 'Robot of Sherwood' Reviewed
  • Patrick Troughton as Robin Hood Seen in 'Robot of Sherwood'
  • How do you rate Doctor Who: Robot of Sherwood? (5=Fantastic)
  • Doctor Who: Podshock Live Show Reviewing 'Robot of Sherwood' Scheduled for Sunday, Sept 7th
  • Doctor Who: Podshock 308 - 'Into The Dalek' Reviewed

  •  Topics  
    Home
    Doctor Who News (188/0)
    DW: Podshock (201/0)
    DW Reviews (33/0)
    Torchwood (15/0)
    Sarah Jane Adven... (13/0)
    General News (29/0)
    Embassy News (19/0)
    Editorials (5/0)
    Alien Tech (2/0)

     Extra! Extra!  

    Become a Podshock Supporting Subscriber


     Randomizer  
    Daleks Invade Manchester:- Dalek Picture 26
    Daleks Invade Manchester:- Dalek Picture 26
    Browse Album

     User Functions  
    :

    :


    Lost your password?

     Support Podshock  

    This site and our podcast are free to use and listen to respectively. Though there are costs involved in maintaining and producing both. If you like, please make a donation to help offset these costs and to help ensure that we can continue to bring you both. Thank you so much.

    You can make a one time donation of any amount you like using the above "Donate" button. If you rather make an annual recurring donation of $25 (that is less than 50 cents a week), use the "Subscribe" button below.

    Save big on toys & collectibles at Entertainment Earth! CLICK HERE for Doctor Who, Star Wars, Buffy, Ozzy, Spider-Man, & more!


     Events  
    There are no upcoming events

     Audible UK  

    Dr Who Audio Downloads from audible.co.uk


     DWNY  
    DWNY

     Ads by Google  

     Older Stories  
    Wednesday 06-May
  • In Russell/Moffat We Trust Shirts and More (1)

  • Tuesday 05-May
  • Join Us for Our Second Second Life Meet Up (3)

  • Friday 01-May
  • Doctor Who: Podshock - Episode 147 (0)

  • Wednesday 29-Apr
  • Sonic Newsdriver for the Week of the 27th of April 2009 (0)

  • Saturday 25-Apr
  • Who Party 14 Toronto Doctor Who Convention (0)
  • Doctor Who: Podshock - Episode 146 (1)

  • Thursday 23-Apr
  • Sonic Newsdriver and Hoo on Who for the Week of the 20 April 2009 (0)
  • Doctor Who: Podshock - Episode 145 (4)

  • Wednesday 15-Apr
  • Three New Producers Announced (0)

  • Saturday 11-Apr
  • Planet Of The Dead Canadian air date confirmed (0)

  • Tuesday 07-Apr
  • Doctor Who: Podshock Recognized as Best Podcast (1)
  • Sonic Newsdriver for the Week of the 5th of April 2009 (0)

  • Wednesday 01-Apr
  • Doctor Who: Podshock - Episode 144 (5)

  • Friday 20-Mar
  • Doctor Who: Podshock - Episode 143 (3)
  • Hitchhiker's Guide to British Sci-Fi - Episode 3 (1)

  •  Notice  

    Doctor Who and the TARDIS are owned and trademarked by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The Gallifreyan Embassy and the Doctor Who: Podshock podcast are not connected to the BBC in any way. No infringement is intended.



     

     
     Home »  Other Science Fiction/Fantasy »  Firefly
    Prev Topic Next Next Topic Printable Version
    Firefly Views: 2035
     Monday, February 12 2007 @ 07:47 PM EST
    [Quote  by:  daveac]
    Is this another US - UK difference?

    Do you pay more to see a film on the openning weekend?

    Here in the UK the only reason not to go the first weekend is the the theatres might be packed or pre-booked - so I suppose with a 'bookingfee' the tickets could be dearer.

    But normally the price stays the same except for some cimemas having cheaper 'day-time' tickets or maybe a mid-week price.

    Cheers, daveac


    I know Taras and Mad4 have already pretty much accurately answered this, but I'll add a little more. As movie prices climbed and climbed (and as my patience for dealing with loud, obnoxious, and/or annoying people sank and sank) I've become more selective about what movies I'll actually spend my hard-earned money on. Most movies released aren't worth the $3 it costs to rent them, let alone $10-12 to see them in a theater. So I have to be pretty passionate about a movie to actually go and see it in a first-run theater. More often than not I'll wait and go to a second-run theater and pay $2-4 or wait a little longer and NetFlix it.

    And to suffer through the mobs of idiot sheeple at the Googleplex on a weekend evening, I have to be really passionate about a movie. Granted, they're usually waiting to see Kicked in the Nuts 2 or something else I have no desire to see. But I really wanted Serenity to have a strong opening box-office showing so I went, and encouraged as many people as I could to go see it that first weekend, too.

    Now, I still refuse to pay the crazy prices for food at a theater so that's where the big pockets come in. I can usually bring in a bottle of Pepsi and a bag of Combos for the cost of a regular soda. Mr. Green

    I'm going "Full Circle" and putting my avatar back to what it was when I first joined. :)
      Profile    PM    Email   
     Quote 
     
     Monday, February 12 2007 @ 10:08 PM EST
    Linquel is correct on the food issue: this is why I love winter - large coat, deep pockets. Of course, the being a woman thing comes in handy during the summer - big purse = cheaper refreshments.

    Taras is also correct about the differences in movie costs of big city versus small city versus town. I've paid $12.50 to see a movie in NYC, $9.00 in Minneapolis, and $4.50 to see a first run film opening weekend where my sister lives in rural Missouri. It's all about what the market will allow (or what we are willing to let the market gouge us for).

    It's rare that I go to the movies to see a hollywood "blockbuster" anymore: the last time I did was for "Eragon" and boy - did that piss me off that I paid for that crap. They get on dvd so fast, what's the point? I mainly go to the art houses to see the indie films and European/Asian flicks: stuff that I may never have the patience to wait for on dvd.

    supremacy is relative
      Profile    PM    Email   
     Quote 
     
     Tuesday, February 13 2007 @ 02:26 AM EST

    In addition to what the market will allow, it is also what the theatre can get away with and still make a profit. What point is it if you can't get enough bodies in to pay the rent. And the rent in Manhattan ain't cheap. Whereas, a filmhouse in a smaller city or town can afford to sell tickets a bit cheaper because the rent isn't as crazy.

    Daleks don't accept apologies! YOU WILL BE EXTERMINATED!
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Tuesday, February 13 2007 @ 02:41 AM EST


    Voulme is a key as well, I live in a "relatively" small town north of Dallas and for matinee prices $2 is about average with later pricing being $4. The key demographic for the Movie House (I refuse to call it Theater) is Teenagers. I did see Serenity on opening weekend in a Movie House, but with unconfortable seating and rude patrons it is not an expierence that I will repeat often. Needless to say I also bought the DVD when it was available, but I do hope that Hollyweird is starting to realize that their delivery system is dying.

    Cheers,
    Mike M.

    I'm a Time Traveler, I point and laugh at archaeologist.
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Tuesday, February 13 2007 @ 08:02 AM EST
    [Quote  by:  merlin_mccarley] Needless to say I also bought the DVD when it was available, but I do hope that Hollyweird is starting to realize that their delivery system is dying.


    That's funny you should say that. A friend just emailed me this link about Pirate's Bay having a site devoted to Oscar torrents. In their "mission statement" they say...

    "To all intellectual property landlords: we are aware that OscarTorrents might annoy you -- but contain your righteous indignation for a while, and think: we're only linking to torrents that already exist. Face it: your membrane has burst, and it wasn't us who burst it. Your precious bodily fluids are escaping.

    You haven't beaten us, so why not join us? Think of a new business model that doesn't involve overpriced pieces of plastic and skanky cinemas hawking cheap carbohydrates while relying on $6/hr projectionists who can't keep a film in focus -- not to mention insulting your audiences by (to pick a few examples) surveilling us with nightvision glasses, searching bags, 30 minutes of commercials and bombarding us with ridiculous anti-piracy propaganda. Take a look at yourselves. Is it really any wonder we're winning?"

    Ok...we're way off topic now. Mr. Green

    I'm going "Full Circle" and putting my avatar back to what it was when I first joined. :)
      Profile    PM    Email   
     Quote 
     
     Tuesday, February 13 2007 @ 08:33 AM EST
    [Quote  by:  Linquel] So I have to be pretty passionate about a movie to actually go and see it in a first-run theater. More often than not I'll wait and go to a second-run theater and pay $2-4


    I think this is what confused me - it doesn't take much ;-)

    As far as I know there are no 'first run' 'second run' cinemas in the UK.

    There are are now just about three different cinema 'groups' running multi-plexes with the odd old style single screen theatres left around the country.

    Anyway for the big film buffs - that don't like the modern 'theatre experience' check out this thread on an AV Forum.

    This chap (SandmanX) spent 70,000 dollars building a Home Theatre in his double garage! Included in the cost is 1000 films on DVD.

    I should warn you the thread is 105 pages long with over 3100 posts - but ALL the detail is there and lots of pretty pictures.

    Here's one to give you an idea of the quality of the build:-

    EDIT - left out the main link!!!

    here



    Get saving fellas!! daveac

    daveac on blip.tv, TalkShoe, iTunes, LiveVideo, uStream, GE, Sci-Fi, DWO, DS & WTA, Dave C on WLP, cooperda on AVF, dac100 on YouTube & PB, dac on Tiscali
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Tuesday, February 13 2007 @ 08:34 AM EST



    Off topic or not, a hearty round of applause to your friend and the arthour of the site. Big Grin I think the Oscars Jumped The Shark when best original song went to "It's Hard out there for a Pimp" Eek! .

    Cheers,
    Mike M.


    I'm a Time Traveler, I point and laugh at archaeologist.
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Tuesday, February 13 2007 @ 08:51 AM EST
    [Quote  by:  daveac]

    This chap (SandmanX) spent 70,000 dollars building a Home Theatre in his double garage! Included in the cost is 1000 films on DVD.

    I should warn you the thread is 105 pages long with over 3100 posts - but ALL the detail is there and lots of pretty pictures.


    Get saving fellas!! daveac


    OK - I'm feeling sorry for anyone trying to check the whole thread out - so if you just want to see the part of the thread with the pictures of the finished Theatre then here it is:- (post #2592)

    here

    Cheers, daveac

    daveac on blip.tv, TalkShoe, iTunes, LiveVideo, uStream, GE, Sci-Fi, DWO, DS & WTA, Dave C on WLP, cooperda on AVF, dac100 on YouTube & PB, dac on Tiscali
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Tuesday, February 13 2007 @ 03:27 PM EST
    [Quote  by:  daveac]
    [Quote  by:  Linquel] So I have to be pretty passionate about a movie to actually go and see it in a first-run theater. More often than not I'll wait and go to a second-run theater and pay $2-4


    I think this is what confused me - it doesn't take much ;-)

    As far as I know there are no 'first run' 'second run' cinemas in the UK.

    Dave, here are some other differences in the US/UK average theatre-going experience:

    • UK cinemas still widely employee genuine theatre seating in that you can specify which particular seat you'd prefer. This is entirely uncommon (though not completely unheard of) in the US. In almost every case, buying tickets to a showing is no guarantee that you and your companion(s) will actually be able to sit together. For very popular opening nights you must therefore arrive early. This explains why the American queues to see Star Wars films, for example, have always prominently featured people people literally camping out for days. In the US, there's somewhat of a disconnect between having a ticket and having a seat.

    • Some movie houses will oversell a showing. Because they've not assigned seats, they either miscount the number of seats available or they actively assume that people with tickets won't show. The staff that are nominally "ushers", too, are really more glorified cleaning crew. Most houses don't actually put a member of staff on the door to most of their theatres to actively check tickets and assist people to their seats. Thus, there's possibly some "unsold seating" going on, as well. It is therefore not an unknown experience to be holding a ticket for which there is no seat.

    • The British thing of having "sweet and savory" popcorn options is generally not present in the US (though sweet popcorn has somewhat recently hit the home microwave market). Theatre popcorn is only savory. [In Hawaii only, popcorn is so widely topped with arare—or as it's known locally, mochi crunch—that every order is served on a deep, disposable tray so as to provide a way to mix the arare and popcorn together.]

    • Obviously, with the predominance of the multiplex, there are almost no remaining movie houses which are "conversions" from live stage theatres. Thus, balcony and/or multi-level seating is rare, though not unheard of in larger, older cities.

    • As cinemas age in the US, they are usually displaced by new, bigger multiplexes. But the cinema left behind is still a perfectly good place to see a movie. Thus, these older houses will tend to go out to pasture as "dollar theatres", where first run movies come to die cheaply. Thus the release cycle in the US is generally that they'll spend two weeks at the most technologically advanced screens at the best theatre in a locality. The biggest movies will often take up more than one screen for at least the first week of release. Then they'll spend an additional two or so weeks off the absolute best screens in a house (that is, the ones that are fully equipped with THX/digital/whatever-the-latest-tech-is). Over that first month, they'll go from multiple showings on multiple screens until eventually they end up with maybe four daily showings on a single screen. Then, the multi-plex cuts the film altogether. At this point, the movie jumps to (at least one) local dollar theatre, where it'll last for up to a month longer. So, typically, if a big film debuts in May, it'll probably be entirely out of a local market by late July or August, by which time the DVD release is, in many cases, just around the corner.

    • Unless times have changed radically, the British do have discounts at cinemas, but the whole thing's done differently. In some cases, particular cinemas (like the Prince Charles in London) will be posh enough, or integrated into the community enough, to offer a kind of "club" or "membership" for regular patrons. Members, who pay an annual support fee, will get deeply discounted tickets. In other cases, there's a kind of "happy hour" going on. Somewhat similar to matinée prices, there are whole days which are considered "slow", and thus cinema management will discount tickets across all showings to encourage traffic. I'm not sure how widespread this still is, but I definitely remember Tuesday being a good day to catch a first-run flick in Bristol in the 90s. (Oddly, now that I'm back in the US, Tuesday still retains movie significance, as it's DVD release day.)

    "I think of myself as ambitious in casting terms, and I know that Bonnie [Langford] has the potential to make the part totally unirritating . . ." — JNT, 1986
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Wednesday, February 14 2007 @ 04:32 PM EST
    Darth -- nice explanation.

    supremacy is relative
      Profile    PM    Email   
     Quote 
     
     Wednesday, February 14 2007 @ 06:18 PM EST
    [Quote  by:  mad4plaid] Darth -- nice explanation.


    Thanks from me as well.

    One thing that seems to be common - is the problem of our film-goers. A the last movie I went to 'Casino Royale' a large group of young kids - 20+ were chucked out for all their antics.

    Cheers, daveac

    daveac on blip.tv, TalkShoe, iTunes, LiveVideo, uStream, GE, Sci-Fi, DWO, DS & WTA, Dave C on WLP, cooperda on AVF, dac100 on YouTube & PB, dac on Tiscali
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Wednesday, February 14 2007 @ 06:53 PM EST
    [Quote  by:  daveac] One thing that seems to be common - is the problem of our film-goers. A the last movie I went to 'Casino Royale' a large group of young kids - 20+ were chucked out for all their antics.

    Happy-snappy ASBOs with hoodies and ringtones?

    Daleks don't accept apologies! YOU WILL BE EXTERMINATED!
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Wednesday, February 14 2007 @ 07:45 PM EST
    [Quote  by:  tarashnat]
    [Quote  by:  daveac] One thing that seems to be common - is the problem of our film-goers. A the last movie I went to 'Casino Royale' a large group of young kids - 20+ were chucked out for all their antics.

    Happy-snappy ASBOs with hoodies and ringtones?


    Oops, I believe the term is Happy Slapping (rather like the homeless beatings you see on the news here). Cry

    I'm a Time Traveler, I point and laugh at archaeologist.
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Wednesday, February 14 2007 @ 08:04 PM EST

    snappy, as in snapping photos of their antics on the cell phone...

    Daleks don't accept apologies! YOU WILL BE EXTERMINATED!
      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     
     Sunday, February 18 2007 @ 12:18 AM EST
    Next to (the new)Battlestar Galactica and (all) Doctor Who, Firefly is my favourite sc-fi type series. I'd have to say though, it's much more like a space western, which is one of the things that appealed to me. J Whedon did a fantastic job writing these stories and assembling a fantastic cast.

    I would love it if we could ever get another series. Someone needs to convince HBO to do it and BSG, since apparently it loses tons of money with every season. I think these would be naturals for the network, as they are/were well-written, challenging much like HBO's own programming (Deadwood, Six Feet Under, Big Love). Their programming is one of the only reasons we have digital cable (the other being classic Doctor Who nightly on BBC Kids Canada).

      Profile    PM    Email    Website 
     Quote 
     

     
    Topic Legend:
    Normal Topic Normal Topic
    Locked Topic Locked Topic
    Sticky Topic Sticky Topic
    New Post New Post
    Sticky Topic W/ New Post Sticky Topic W/ New Post
    Locked Topic W/ New Post Locked Topic W/ New Post
    Subscribe to this topic Subscribe to this topic
    You may not post messages
    Full HTML is allowed
    Words are censored